28th session of the CIE: Manchester, UK

August 18th, 2014, Published in Articles: Vector

 

The International Commission on Illumination (CIE) has recently celebrated its 100th anniversary as the core international organisation for cooperation and exchange of information on all aspects of light and lighting.

The abbreviation CIE comes from the French (Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage), and it was in Paris that we marked the beginnings of our organisation, founded in that city in 1913.

Today, the CIE does a great deal more than exchange information. Nonetheless, cooperation, discussion and dissemination remain central to our mission and it is my great pleasure to invite you to participate in these activities at the 28th session of the Commission, between 28 June and 4 July 2015.

Those unfamiliar with CIE may wonder what is meant by a session: it is both a scientific meeting and a turning point in the lifecycle of the CIE. The session is the point at which the outgoing board hands over to a new board – my final role as president. It also marks one of the points when the CIE general assembly must meet, attended by representatives of all our national committees

Abstract submission now open

You are invited to submit abstracts summarising the contents of your intended paper dealing with new results in the field of light and lighting. The subjects of the papers should be relevant to the work and the terms of reference of the seven CIE divisions and their technical committees (for detailed information on domains of interest, please consult the CIE website). Contributions published elsewhere before will not be accepted. Papers dealing with questions of direct concern to the work of the Divisions will get priority.

Contact Sue Swash, IESSA, Tel 011 476-4171, sue@iessa.org.za

 

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