Biennial regional research findings published

February 1st, 2019, Published in Articles: PositionIT

The Gauteng City-Region Observatory (GCRO) released its Quality of Life (QoL) 2017/2018 survey with preliminary results in November 2018, the latest in a series of five such surveys.

The survey, which covers three metros and several other local municipalities, was conducted between October 2017 and August 2018 and had 24 889 respondents. It included 248 questions across 14 categories including social, economic, governance, migration, dwelling and services, standard of living, urban, mobility, and sustainability themes. It also included new questions on education and on respondent’s knowledge about the roles of different levels of government.

GCRO research director Graeme Götz releasing the results from the survey.

GCRO research director Graeme Götz releasing the results from the survey.

Among other things the QoL 2017/2018 survey found continued improvement in the Quality of Life index. Respondents reported crime, unemployment and drugs/alcohol to be the biggest problems in their communities. The City Ekurhuleni and Midvaal Local Municipality showed the greatest improvements on the services satisfaction index (made up of ten variables), with the City of Joburg and the City of Tshwane declined. The City Ekurhuleni saw the greatest improvement in quality of life, while the City of Joburg’s remained consistent and the City of Tshwane’s declined. Emfuleni Local Municipality fared the worst on this index following a dramatic decline in satisfaction with waste services such as waste removal and water purification processing. (See other outcomes here.)

Service satisfaction index 2018.

Service satisfaction index 2018.

This information provides policy analysis and support to inform provincial government decision-making, and since its benchmarked, indicate changes in perception. Dissatisfaction in the QoL surveys are also known to affect voter turnout.

This latest Quality of Life survey incorporated more quality control than previous surveys, and modelled the field work and quality control in real-time. With aspects such as the concentration of wealth and inequality, drug problems and mobility having distinct spatial characteristics, the survey makes extensive use of geography and GIS. It on draws on various geospatial datasets including those from GeoTerraImage, AfriGIS and Lightstone in defining, planning and complementing results from the survey. Geofencing and questionnaire GPS coordinates are also used for operational and quality control purposes, and later allows for geospatial analyses. Data from the surveys (latest still pending) is also accessible in the GCRO’s GIS Viewer.

Prof Tshilidzi Marwala (deputy VC, UJ), David Makhura (Premier of Gauteng), Dr Rob Moore (GCRO's executive director) and Prof Zeblon Vilakazi (deputy VC, Wits) discussing the results of the survey.

Prof Daniel Mashao (Executive dean of FEBE at UJ), David Makhura (Premier of Gauteng), Dr Rob Moore (GCRO’s executive director) and Prof Zeblon Vilakazi (deputy VC, Wits) discussing the results of the survey.

The GCRO is a government-funded regional research initiative and is a partnership between the University of Johannesburg, the University of the Witwatersrand, the Gauteng Provincial Government, and organised local government in Gauteng (SALGA-Gauteng). Results from the survey are published in books, research reports, data briefs, academic publications, presentations, a map of the month, policy and other outputs.

Contact GCRO, info@gcro.ac.za

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