Digital tool helps secure land and resource rights

June 6th, 2019, Published in Articles: PositionIT

At the World Bank Land and Poverty Conference 2019, Cadasta Foundation revealed findings concerning the impact of new mobile technologies that are helping more than one million of the world’s most vulnerable people obtain rights to their land in urban slums and rural regions in 17 countries, while creating a model for addressing some of the most intractable obstacles to access government services and sustainable livelihoods in poor countries. To illustrate the success of local partners in using the Cadasta platform and digital tools, researchers presented results of their work on two pilot projects, one in a rural post-conflict region of the Democratic Republic of Congo, and a second in the slums of Odisha, India. Secure tenure is seen as vital to any development scheme. Using Cadasta software to survey households and collect land occupancy data, the collaboration in India led to the issuing of property certificates that cover more than 525 000 slum dwellers. The participating communities reaped almost immediate benefits, according to the researchers. In the first group that received certificates of ownership, parents already have succeeded in registering their children for school, applied for government jobs and avoided eviction. A second paper, covering a rural project in the Democratic Republic of Congo, describes the work of a team of land administration specialists who mapped and documented 3000 parcels of land on behalf of more than 17 000 people. In collaboration with partners on the ground, the experts introduce participatory methods aimed at reviving a defunct irrigation scheme that improved agricultural production in an area historically plagued by conflict.

Contact Cadasta, info@cadasta.org

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