Feedback from FIG Working Week 2019

June 3rd, 2019, Published in Articles: PositionIT

The FIG Working Week and General Assembly took place in Hanoi, Vietnam from 22 to 26 April 2019, with almost 1000 attendees from 90 countries. The first general assembly had 58 member associations present and around 250 delegates, while the second had 56 member association and around 300 delegates. One new member association, the American Association for Geodetic Surveying, was admitted.

FIG president Rudolf Staiger presented the Council Work Plan, followed by commission chairs, networks and permanent institutions which presented their plans for the term 2019 to 2022. Two new task forces were also introduced: an internal task force on an evaluation of the FIG Governance chaired by vice president Diane Dumashie, and a task force on FIG and the Sustainable Development Goals with Paula Dijkstra as chair.

Mika-Petteri Torhönen from World Bank was the key note speaker, and master of ceremonies Prof. Dr Vo Chi My let the opening ceremony. During the Working Week over 300 papers were presented in 80 technical sessions. There were sessions with institutional partners such as FAO, UN-Habitat/GLTN, UN-GGIM and the World Bank, while other sessions were on specific topics, some to support FIG Task Forces. The FIG platinum corporate members Esri, Trimble and Leica Geosystems each had a technical session.

Chryssy Potsiou, the FIG President from 2015 to 2018 was appointed Honorary President. There was only one bid for the Working Week 2023 from Orlando, Florida, USA, and at the second general assembly it was clear that the bid was accepted without the need for a vote.

Contact Louise Friis-Hansen, FIG, louise.friis-hansen@fig.net

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